Fish Vocabulary

Rainbow Trout Fish

Names of the most well-known fish

FISH ( pronounced – fɪʃ ) Noun

  1. A limbless cold-blooded vertebrate animal with gills and fins living wholly in water. i.e. The huge lakes are now devoid of fish.
    • The flesh of fish as food. i.e. A dinner of meat, dried fish, and bread.
    • The zodiacal sign or constellation Pisces.
  2. British (informal) – A person who is strange in a specified way. i.e. He is generallyhttps://www.learn-english-now.co/study/words/fish/ thought to be a bit of a cold fish.

FISH – Verb: to fish.

  1. To catch or try to catch fish, typically by using a net or hook and line. i.e. He was fishing for pike. Synonyms: go fishing, angle, cast, trawl.
  2. To search by groping or feeling for something concealed. i.e. He fished for his registration certificate and held it up to the policeman.
anchovy angel bass
bream carp chub
cod dogfish dolphin
eel flounder goldfish
grouper haddock hake
halibut herring kingfish
koi mackerel monkfish
perch pike plaice
red snapper roach salmon
sardine (pilchard) shark snapper
sole starfish tarpon
trout tuna turbot

Some Interesting Facts

(Courtesy of Science for Kids, New Zealand)

Fish are vertebrate animals that live in the water. Vertebrate means they have a spinal cord surrounded by bone or cartilage.

They have gills that extract oxygen from the water around them.

There are over 30,000 known species.

Some flatfish use camouflage to hide themselves on the ocean floor.

Tuna can swim at speeds of up to 70 kph (43 mph).

Relative to their body size, they have small brains compared to most other animals.

They are covered in scales which are often covered in a layer of slime to help their movement through water.

Cleaner fish help others by removing parasites and dead skin from their scales.

Although jellyfish and crayfish have the word ‘fish’ in their name, they aren’t actually fish.

Over 1000 species are threatened by extinction.

Mermaids are mythological creatures with the upper body of a woman and a tail for the lower half.

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